The World Beyond: al-Jazira Sadim

Episode V: House on Not-So-Haunted Hill

When in doubt, look down

I joined the adventurers who rescued me on campaign to cleanse the haunted house on the bluff of evil. Ismail ibn Yusef was pretty excited to do some exorcising and the lizard man (I feel bad calling him that, but I can’t pronounce or spell his name. I’ll call him Liz.) was ready to pound some ghouls into the netherworld. We set out early in the day, with Liz figuring that the evil that lurked within the house may have an aversion to sunlight. We didn’t run into much trouble at first. The house seemed simply deserted and run down. I watched as Gebbel Al-Udun checked for traps and listened for trouble. He’s got such a way with such things! Each time we came to a door he’d check it for trouble and Liz would tie a rope around the much lighter Gebbel who then proceeded across the condemned floors. Twice the floor fell out under him and Liz had to haul him back up. It worked out to our advantage, though, as with Gebbel falling through the floor he was able to deduce that the room directly below had nothing of interest. Another wrong step caused part of the balcony to disintegrate from under him. We decided to go downstairs and came across a room that yelled warnings at us! We were all pretty spooked—poor Ismail and Gebbel went a bit mad! While they were fretting I looked up and didn’t see anything. Liz checked the window that looked out on the patio but no undead were there. On a hunch I examined the floor and found a well-concealed trap door. We went down and found a single Christian at a table. He ran for what seemed a solid wall but Liz grabbed him mid-stride. Ismail interrogated him with the help of Liz’s intimidation! We found that he had been running to a secret door which hid a study. We found some interesting liquids in a poorly needle trapped box under a bed. I found a really nice lantern! Ismail found more books, including one on mesmerism. He also found some scraps of paper with words on them but we never found out what they were for. I’m hoping I can use the well-crafted lenses in one of my tinkerings. Upon further questioning of the little man we found his fellows would be returning. There was a door marked DANGER and we all agreed that since the little man couldn’t be trusted his signs couldn’t either. Liz broke his neck and threw him in the room to see if anything attacked him. Inside were piles of bones which began to move! Rather than fight so many skeletons we ran away and locked the door behind us. We found a stair case and went down it into some caverns below the house. While stretching in a room off the tunnel Liz was attacked by a slime! It ate his armor and Ismail threw water on it which killed it somehow. Maybe it was magic water? We went deeper in the cave and found a boat had been there recently. On our way back we found another passage that lead to the right. We took it and found some little dog men guarding some nice fabrics. They attacked us! Liz bonked them each on the head and when they woke up they didn’t know where they were. Turns out they were mesmerized and taken from their homes. We think the little man’s friends are actually pirates or slave traders. We sent the dog men to talk to their leader and tell her that we freed them. I think my companions aren’t well-liked by the dog men’s tribe. I hope that this helps their reputation with the dog people. Then we looked around the house some more. We were attacked by giant centipedes! Oh was I scared! They finally went away after we fought to get them off of Gebbel. It turned out there was no treasure in the house! No scary monsters except the skeletons but I think they were left there as protection while the pirates were away). Frustrated we burned the not-so-scary house down. We will be returning to town to tell everyone we destroyed the haunted house. Maybe that will help my new friends’ reputation. The people in that town didn’t seem like they liked my friends.

—Balmar

Comments

brentzooka

I'm sorry, but we no longer support this web browser. Please upgrade your browser or install Chrome or Firefox to enjoy the full functionality of this site.